Parallel Sessions

View and download a printable version of the timetable here (632KB).
Parallel sessions are subject to change.

Thursday, October 24

Grand Learning Space
Simultaneous Interpretation

The Arts Ascend Room

Transforming Communities Room

Empowering Young People Room

Innovation in Collaboration Room

International Perspectives Room

The Power of Arts Education Room

1:30 - 2:30pm
Themes: Reconciliation; Arts & Learning in Schools and Communities
Decolonizing and Indigenizing Arts Education: Learning from Indigenous Elders, Knowledge and Wisdom Keepers, Artists and Scholar This workshop will focus on Decolonizing and Indigenizing Art Education and how we can learn from and work with Indigenous Elders, Artists, Scholars, Community Members and Organizations within systems of public schooling. How can we uphold and implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the rights of Indigenous Peoples. Topics discussed will include cultural safety, Indigenous arts protocols and the complexities of cultural appropriation, as well as addressing Call to Action #83 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission: A strategy for Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists to undertake collaborative projects and produce works that contribute to the reconciliation process which lays out a roadmap for ‘awi-niigaani-mino-wiiji-inawendiwin’ 
– ‘going forward together in harmony.’
Presenter:
Tanya Senk Tanya Senk is a Métis/Nehiyaw/Saulteaux educator, artist and scholar. She is currently the Centrally Assigned Principal, Indigenous Education and the Principal of Kapapamahchakwe - Wandering Spirit School, Toronto District School Board
Toronto, ON
INDIGENizeUS at Young People's Theatre INDIGENizeUS is a program designed to educate and raise the cultural awareness of Young People's Theatre staff to the live and vibrant culture of different local Indigenous Artists, Elders, Facilitators and Educators. The program is rooted in the cultural sacredness of the seven grandfather teachings; the artistic practice of the facilitator; and dependent on the participant’s willingness to be open and receptive to a non-linear, generational knowledge.
Dr. Duke Redbird (Saugeen First Nation) offered Wisdom through poetry. Rosary Pavica (Fort Albany First Nation) taught Humility through creating medicine pouches. Elder Pauline Shirt (Saddle Lake First Nation) smudged and shared stories about respecting creation. J’net Ayayqwayaksheelth (Ahousaht First Nation) spoke about Love and resiliency, and the relationship of Indigenous peoples and Canada.
Veronica Johnny (Fort Smith Northwest Territories) shared Bravery through hand-drumming and song. Nimkii Oswawamick (Wiikwemkoong Unceeded First Nation) shared Truth through storytelling with hoop dance. Leslie McCue (Curve Lake First Nation) taught social dances using Honesty to share her personal journey.
The artistic disciplines and philosophies guiding the program are ancient Indigenous ways of learning and living, that are continually being re-discovered as contemporary practice. At CNAL I am proposing the Indigenous pathway of orally re-telling the story of the program, and sharing how the conversation we are now having at Young People’s Theatre have led to a path of reconciliation through important ongoing commitments for the company to create new partnerships and meaningful engagement with Indigenous communities.
Presenter:
Lindy Kinoshameg Lindy Kinoshameg – Community Engagement Facilitator – Young People’s Theatre (YPT)
Odawa nation (Pike clan), raised in Wiikwemkoong Unceeded First Nation, the last 10 years has been focused on Indigenous cultural awareness and breaking stereotypes through the arts. Always striving to discover that new art-form, incorporating Indigenous values and teachings into his everyday practice, and sharing his knowledge with others.
Toronto, ON
Bilingual Session
Themes: Arts & Learning in the Digital Age; Music Creation & Education
Participatory Creative Music Hub, an on-line resource by and for people who create their own music Participatory Creative Music is a diverse grassroots movement experiencing great growth and enthusiasm in Canada and around the world. As part of an international movement in participatory arts practices with an outward-looking approach to public arts experiences, Participatory Creative Music creates strong communities of musicians who create their own music and support music-making in a myriad of forms, from within very different fields. In response to this movement, the Canadian New Music Network (CNMN) is in the midst of developing a Participatory Creative Music Hub. This online resource will act as a repertory of artists and stakeholders working in Participatory Creative Music, a repository of works and scores created by that community and a showcase for the documentation of its works and projects. In addition, the project's mandate is also to make initial contact with stakeholders working in environments ranging from education, health, social services, rehabilitation and corrections to enhance their awareness of the resources and network available to them. Geographic and discipline multiplicity argue for such a hub to be digital, connecting people, ideas and works through a searchable repertory and archive, both to celebrate and share achievements and also to nurture and inspire this growing field. At CNMN, we believe such a resource will lead to greater experimentation and creativity as we begin to connect and learn from one another.
This presentation will feature an introduction to Participatory Creative Music and the Hub, a brief participatory music activity, and a focused group discussion asking for input on what you need and want in a resource such as this.
Presenter:
Louise Campbell Louise Campbell is a Montreal-based musician, participatory arts facilitator and cultural mediator. Louise seeks to interrogate and renew the ways in which we make music by creating new works with everyone, regardless of age, ability, level of prior experience, or training. She has toured improvised and composed musics across Canada, the US, France, Germany, and Brazil. louisecampbell.ca
Montréal, QC
At the Crossroads of cultures : Inspired by composer Katia Makdissi-Warren to Explore Music Creativity with Kids Canadian composers have a fascinating view of our world and can be a rich source of inspiration for creative projects in schools and communities. Based on extensive experience with teachers, children and composers, we will present the Contemporary Music Society of Quebec’s (SMCQ) educational programs with a focus on current 2019-2020 activities around featured composer Katia Makdissi-Warren. Reknown for her vision of music as an experience of encounter and sharing between cultures, this inspiring and innovative artist, at the crossroads of Middle Eastern, Western and Indigenous cultures, presents an eloquent example of living together through art. Throughout the year, children are invited to discover her work through various activities, including singing her work "Open Spaces" for choir and Inuit throat singing, watching video clips about intercultural collaborations or presenting their own compositions at the « Budding Composers » concerts. Workshops with Katia Makdissi-Warren, throat singers and musicians from different cultural traditions are also offered to participating schools across Canada. We will discuss how these projects bringing together schools and musicians from different cultural backgrounds, including First Nations, promote reconciliation through arts and learning and contribute to building a more tolerant and open society.
Founded in 1966 by a group of prominent composers, the SMCQ is a well established non-profit organization with the mandate to promote Canadian music. In addition to an annual concert season, a biennial international New Music festival and flourishing Tribute Series, the SMCQ Youth component offers various special projects to involve kids in experimenting new works and creating music of their own and offers free educational material ( smcqeducation.ca/en/ ) which is used by approximately 22,000 students in more than 100 schools annually.
Presenter:
Claire Cavanagh As the Educational Projects Officer at the SMCQ, Claire Cavanagh works closely with composers and music teachers to create educational material and projects inspired by today’s living composers. She is currently completing a Masters degree in Music education at Laval University about composition projects in schools.
Montréal, QC
Themes: Health & Well-Being; Arts & Learning in Communities
Creation of Creative Space: A Case Study The strength and resilience of Western Canada is rooted in Indigenous communal values in concert with varieties of other cultures.
Survival of my ancestors relied upon interdependence and a willingness to work hard to ensure the future of children. Art-making and play were key elements of Metis society: the flourishing music, for example, of Metis tradition promoted social cohesion. My parents, one Metis and one Settler, met playing in a teenage band; as children, we danced before we walked.
Art is a tool of transformation whereby new places and spaces to ‘dream large’ are born.
This conference visions convergence, a coming together from divergent points of view. The noun convergence suggests a progressive integration of previously distinct beliefs.
This concept may be enlarged by considering ‘confluence’ of beliefs. Defined as “the place where two rivers meet,” or simply, “a coming together”, confluence suggests a ‘stirring’ or ‘interplay’ between belief systems.
Winnipeg is a Cree word translated as ‘muddy water’. At the fork of The Red and Assiniboine in a plain composed of an ancient lake-bottom, there’s a great stirring, swirling and blurring as the joined waterways enlarge, flowing together northward.
When peoples of differing ancient stories and beliefs come together, there are often stirrings beneath and beyond words, as well as shared hopes. Unnamed conflict can undermine, sabotage good-will.
From the first embrace of European traders by Indigenous women to the present, individuals of diverse cultures and belief systems have been negotiating tender, and often conflicted interpersonal relationships.
This presentation explores art-making in the inner life of one individual and family.
Formation of ‘contained creative space’ where ‘cries’ may be expressed, and conflicts named, enable new dreams to be born. Courageous inner journeys, confronting our own pre-conceived ideas of ‘the other’, can lead to healing, respect, reconciliation and inclusion.
Presenter:
Joyce Clouston Joyce Clouston, PhD, RSW. Social work research and clinical practice include exploring models of child care synthesizing Indigenous and mainstream values.Transcribing, writing and editing include bridging spiritual traditions.
Winnipeg, MB
Spreading the news: IkKaumaujammik and the Labrador Creative Arts Festival The Labrador Creative Arts Festival is one of Canada’s longest running children’s festivals. For 43 years it has been an annual event that brings together students from across Labrador's remote communities with artists from various disciplines. Each night students perform plays that they have written. The scripts have been collected over all these years. Many of the plays deal with Inuit identity that changed over time. IkKaumajammik- In partnership with the Nunatsiavut government and the SSHRC project Tradition and Transition, this project has reintroduced and reproduced some of these scripts alongside accompanying notes and interviews with the original creators of this work in 5 Inuit communities.. As community members rehearse and devise their own work, the processes in collecting, creating, rehearsing and performing this material are highlighted. An accompanying on-line handbook for emerging playwrights augments the scripts and the interviews. The intention of this project is to revive adult theatre troupes in each community and to encourage and provide a basis for any future community- based play production. The challenge is to share these outstanding community commentaries with a larger world .
Presenter:
Tim Borlase Tim has been actively involved in promoting and sustaining the arts and culture of Labrador for 45 years.He believes that in this age of globalization and interconnectivity, being rooted in one’s own culture, heritage and history is essential for young people.
Pointe -du- Chëne, NB
Themes: Youth-Led Initiatives; Community Arts Programs; Social Justice & Reconciliation
Propuesta no Protesta; The R.I.S.E. of the Grassroots Movement Many grassroots movements are built out of passion and destiny. Some are built out of adversity. In every adversity many of us face, there is a grassroots movement waiting to be built. R.I.S.E. and One Mic Educators (OME) are movements built out of adversity implementing innovative initiatives with a global reach.
In 2017, SPIN mobilized the Ontario Arts Council funded OME 2.0 youth program along to attend the 2017 CNAL Conference. The diverse group came unapologetically prepared to make their presence felt. Through the phenomenal contributions of the youth & facilitatorsat the conference, the group was invited to participate in the closing Keynote presentation of the conference. This led to multiple contracts and opportunities including a Canadian Heritage & CNAL funded video poem "Immigrant Indigenous Friendship", conference bookings through the Trillium Lakelands District School Board and most recently an artist residency opportunity in Cree Indigenous Territory. Under the leadership of Artist Facilitators SPIN El Poeta, Amoya Ree, Jennifer Alicia Murrin, YES The Poet and Mohawk elder Sylvia Bero, the OME 2.0 youth participated in numerous workshops that led to the creation of the Immigrant Indigenous Friendship video poem which will be shared.
Randell Adjei will share the trajectory and impact of the organization he founded in April 2012. Reaching Intelligent Souls Everywhere (RISE) is a community led by youth, comprised of artists, activists and revolutionaries. Together they create a safe and welcoming platform for self-expression and healing through the performance arts. R.I.S.E focuses on artist development and getting artists paid learning and performance opportunities. Many young people have credited R.I.S.E with changing and saving their lives. A central philosophy Randell constantly shares with his audience is “I am not my struggles, I am not my pain, they’re just roadblocks proving how far I came”.
Presenters:
SPIN El Poeta SPIN El Poeta is a Guatemalan poet, youth advocate, former refugee, 2X Toronto Poetry Slam Grand Slam champion, proprietor of arts education enterprise One Mic Educators, founder of #LA3Raza Open Mic A series designed to weave together Indigenous, African Diaspora and Latin American artists for nights of cross-cultural and intercultural learning.
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Randell Adjei Randell Adjei is an Author, Inspirational Speaker, Arts Educator and Community Leader who uses the spoken word to empower and transform through Edutainment. He is the founder of one of Toronto's largest and longest running youth led initiatives; Reaching Intelligent Souls Everywhere (R.I.S.E Edutainment).
The beat of his art was found after years of being lost. He found himself by turning his struggles around to inspire others. His story is one of an Alchemist who truly transformed his life from rock to gold inspiring everyone he comes into contact to strive to unearth the pure potential within them.
Randell shares these messages on various stages as an emcee/host, performer and arts practitioner.
Randell is also a MaRS DD - Studio Y Cohort 2 Fellow, 1 of 5 coaches involved in the Toronto Public Library’s (Poetry Saved Our Lives) project and a regularly sought after speaker and presenter with the Toronto District School Board and Toronto Catholic School Board.
A featured performer on TEDxUTSC and has shared stages with the likes of Jessie Reyez, Terry Crews, Paul Mooney, Maestro Fresh Wes and D’bi Young.
Toronto, ON
Art City At Art City, two worlds collide that traditionally exist in completely different galaxies: the world of contemporary practicing artists, and the world of marginalized people with little resources who are typically denied access to the contemporary art world altogether.
Artistic Director Eddie Ayoub will present on the joys and challenges of offering a space where artists and community members collaborate to their mutual wellbeing, informing artistic practice and enhancing quality of life.
Presenter:
Eddie Ayoub Eddie Ayoub is an artist and 27-year participant in Winnipeg's art community. He is Artistic Director of Wanda Koop's community art organization, Art City.
Ayoub has directed Art City programming since 2007 and is co-chair of the Manitoba Artist-Run Centres Coalition (MARCC), representing Manitoba and serving as Chair of the national Artist-Run Centres and Collectives Conference (ARCA) Board.
Ayoub is also a member of the Youth Agencies Alliance (YAA) Executive Committee and a member of the City of Winnipeg’s OurWinnipeg Community Advisory Committee, helping to shape the foundation of Winnipeg's future development priorities.
Themes: Arts & Learning in Schools; Artist & Teacher Partnerships
Building capacity in schools: The legacy of successful collaborative partnerships Through partnership between the Saskatchewan Arts Board (SAB), Ministry of Education and SaskCulture, the Artists in Schools grant program and LIVE streaming e-learning broadcasts offer K-12 students in Saskatchewan innovative arts and learning experiences through collaboration with professional artists.
This presentation will focus on the distinctive features of exemplary artists in schools’ projects, residencies and distance learning broadcasts that are collaboratively developed to deepen students’ understanding of artists and their work, explore creative processes, support the provincial arts education curriculum, and promote life-long learning in the arts.
Engaging youth in classroom-based action research, the Artists in Schools program (formerly ArtsSmarts) supports teachers and artists to work together in planning and designing inquiry-based arts projects that are tailored to meet the needs and interests of the school communities involved.
The presentation will highlight the unique 20-year partnership between the two largest provincial arts and cultural organizations and the Ministry of Education and joint initiatives that support cross-curricular and cross-cultural arts and learning opportunities for students.
Through immersive experiences and active deep engagement, the projects, residencies and digital broadcasts are proving to have a significant impact on student learning; yielding positive results in cognitive development, personal (mental and physical health) and social outcomes and well-being.
The presentation will provide examples of teachers and students working in partnership with First Nations and Métis artists to build relationships and move communities and schools further towards reconciliation. It will also highlight other projects that are engaging students who may face barriers due to a disability or who are Newcomers and whose primary language in not English. Through unique design, these specialized projects enliven the students’ experience, encouraging not only curiosity and creativity but also fostering empathy, thus cultivating a more inclusive, safe and democratic society.
Presenter:
Jody Greenman-Barber Jody Greenman-Barber is an artist, teacher and collaborator. She is the Program Consultant for the Saskatchewan Arts Board responsible for Artists in Schools, Artists in Communities, and LIVE ARTS.
Regina, SK
Arts Matter at the GECDSB, Windsor, Ontario This presentation shares the nationally-recognized work of the GECDSB in supporting, developing and maintaining a strong Arts presence in the daily learning of our students. Community partnerships, ongoing Arts PD for our educators, Arts integration in the classroom, public performances and continued investment by senior administration continue to be a priority in our overall Board Improvement Plan (BIPSA).
Recognized in 2019 by the Canadian Network for Arts and Learning as a Board of Gold Standard, join us as we share the many ways that Arts Matter at the GECDSB!
Presenters:
Dr. Clara Howitt Dr. Howitt has been an educator and leader for over 20 years. She has been a classroom teacher, school Principal, system Program leader and Superintendent of Education throughout her career. During the last decade Dr. Howitt has been in service as a Superintendent responsible for Curriculum and Program K-12 as well as Leadership Development. Dr. Howitt has a particular interest and knowledge of change theory, program evaluation, educational policy and leadership development.
Dr. Bernadette Berthelotte Bernadette Berthelotte is a native of Toronto, Ontario who came to Windsor in 1977 to begin her Bachelor of Music Degree in Horn Performance. Upon completing this degree, Dr. Berthelotte pursued and completed a Master of Music Degree in Horn Performance and Theory from Wayne State University in 1984. She continued her education at the University of Windsor and in 1985, received a Bachelor of Education, and a Master's in Education in 1990. In 2007 Dr. Berthelotte completed a Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Music Education at Michigan State University.
In addition to her busy teaching and work schedule, Dr. Berthelotte's orchestral experience is vast. She regularly performs with the Windsor Symphony Orchestra and continues to freelance in and around the City of Windsor and Detroit. Her past orchestral experiences include the Detroit Civic Symphony Orchestra, the Detroit Metropolitan Orchestra, the Canadian Chamber Orchestra and the Regina Symphony Orchestra.
Dr. Berthelotte's awards include a full scholarship from Wayne State University in 1981, a full fellowship from Michigan State University in 1997, the S. Hunter Henry Memorial Scholarship in 1998, 1999, the Government of Canada's Female Doctoral Award in 1997 and 1998, and the Prime Minister’s Award for Teaching in 2003.
After spending 23 years teaching instrumental music full-time at W.F. Herman Secondary School in Windsor, Dr. Berthelotte is now the Teacher Consultant for the Arts for the Greater Essex County District School Board. Additionally, she also teaches Music Education courses at the University of Windsor in the Faculty of Education.
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Karen McClellan Karen McClellan, Executive Director, Arts Can Teach
Karen is a business owner, educator, arts advocate, professional orchestral cellist and social entrepreneur. Karen began cello in her northern Alberta public school's music program, leading to a BMus and AVCM in Cello Performance and Teacher Training. In 1999-2018, Karen was an artist educator and mentor for Learning Through the Arts, a groundbreaking program created by Angela Elster and the Royal Conservatory. Karen is a valued leader and artist mentor, supporting, training and empowering artists from diverse disciplines to discover and share their creative strengths.
In 2018 Karen founded Arts Can Teach to continue and expand dynamic hands-on learning and artist-teacher partnerships in Windsor-Essex schools and community centres. Learn more at artscanteach.ca
Windsor, ON
Themes: Social Justice; Arts for Children & Youth; International Perspectives
Arts education as TVET: Empowering youth for creativity The creative sector in Kenya, as in much of Africa, is home to many young individuals. Due to the number of youths involved in the sector, and with the country's expressed need to engage society in activities towards economic sustainability, our project focuses on enhancing creativity to empower post-secondary school youth towards economic empowerment and community development. In this presentation, I shall highlight the context of the project and present information from a survey of people involved in creative enterprises and how these contributed to the articulation of content for a curriculum. I will further describe how the developed curriculum is fashioned to conform to the mandate of the country's technical and vocational education and training (TVET). Finally, the resolutions of a conference under the same theme will be summarised to demonstrate the thinking of selected academic and practising creatives in the country.
Presenter:
Emily Akuno Trained as a music performer-educator in Kenya, USA and UK, Emily Achieng' Akuno's research focuses on cultural relevance in music education and the use of music to develop literacy skills.
Kenya
“The children are painting the world” social fund “The Children are Painting the World” Social Fund is a nongovernmental organization from Kazakhstan. The main goals of the Fund are: popularization of the achievements of art, culture, intangible and tangible heritage; promotion of a healthy lifestyle and meaningful leisure time; environment and sustainable development, etc. The main project of our Fund is an annual art contest with the album series under the auspices of UNESCO. The project started in 1999 during the UN General assembly session. In 2019 the project celebrates its 20th anniversary. This is a very bright and significant event, which has become a national and international movement for children’s and youth creativity.
Presenter:
Moldir Bekzhan Moldir Bekzhan has headed such organizations as “The Children are Painting the World” Social Fund, “Art Invest” Education Centre, Kazakhstan Association of Children & Family Entertainment, “Youth for healthy way of life” Public Organization, Kazakhstan National Federation of UNESCO Clubs, etc.
Kazakhstan
Themes: Music Education; Arts & Learning in Schools; Children & Youth
Creating Space to Support the Arts As a proprietor of Rural Notes Music Services, and a long-term volunteer for non profits such as Magnificient River Rats Festival Society and the Athabasca and District Music Festival Association, I am very aware of the need for space for the arts to flourish. Why do communities support an ice arena or baseball diamonds with ease but find it such a big leap to support dance studios and creative art spaces? This presentation discusses the social benefits of having spaces dedicated to the arts.
Dedicated spaces for the arts will allow individuals and groups to flourish in rural communities. The creative process is very eclectic in the beginning exploration stages and narrows down toward definite choices by the end versus sports training which leans toward very structured practices and free wheeling choices in the end product. Playing a game in sports requires improvisational skills whereas presenting in the arts requires dedicated and focussed skills. The goal is to understand the development process within artistic activities.
This presentation will walk through the benefits of having events present up and coming artists. Supporting developing artists through having space to work and perform is an important aspect of a thriving community. Community events such as Open Mike sessions, country music jams, and group studies all create space for the arts to flourish. Have space for the arts is about overcoming preconceived ideas and encouraging change through development of creative process skills. I will be discussing how to build a community through community events planning and supporting open spaces for the arts and allow for creative process.
Presenter:
Ida Edwards Ida Edwards, B of Music,Vocal Performance and composition minor, Musician, community builder and volunteer, town Councillor, business owner, Served as an executive member on many community boards in support of learning through the arts
Athabasca, AB
National music education study On June 1, 2019 the Coalition launched a national research study to investigate the current landscape of music education in Canada. Twenty-one organizations have made a commitment to support the project, and with key partners -Canadian Music Educators’ Association, Music Canada, MusiCounts, Canadian Network for Arts and Learning and People for Education- the Coalition is confident that this study will be historic, as it addresses many emerging issues that are influencing the future of all art programs but especially music in schools across the country. Principal investigator Dr. Adam Jonathan Con of the University of Victoria, in collaboration with Eric Favaro and Angela Elster have created a network of provincial and regional contacts to help gather information from all levels that work with or affect the subject of music education. Implemented over three phases, the scope of this study is to create a marker to help all the stakeholders who have a vested interest in K – 12 Music Education to better understand how the subject exists from region to region, the factors that contribute to the access to music education, and to provide information to support its future growth and development in Canada. It is our common understanding that a quality education for all includes the arts and this study begins with music education.
Presenters:
Dr. Adam Con Dr. Adam Jonathan Con is Associate Dean of Fine Arts, Head of Music Education, Graduate Choral Conducting and conductor of the 170-voice UVIC Chorus at the University of Victoria. He served in similar capacities at the Bob Cole Conservatory of Music, California State University, Long Beach, at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio and at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, Georgia. He authoured the largest study on the state of K-7 music education in British Columbia and is currently the principal investigator for the National Study on the State of Music Education in Canada. In frequent demand as a presenter, clinician and choral conductor, Dr. Con has participated at events such as the Foro Coro Americano in Argentina, I Foro Internacional De Educación Musical in Mexico, Podium: Canadian National Choral Conducting Symposium, National American Orff-Schulwerk Conference, the Canadian National GALA Conference, the National Canadian Orff- Schulwerk Conference, the Manitoba Provincial Music Educator’s Conference, the Alberta Provincial Music Educator’s Conference, the British Columbia Provincial Music Educator’s Conference, the British Columbia Choral Federation Chorfest and Youth Choir, the Unitarian Universalist Musicians National American Conference, Ohio State Music Educator’s Conference, the Georgia State American Choral Directors Association Conference, and the Georgia Music Educator’s Conference.
Dr. Eric Favaro Dr. Eric Favaro is a passionate education advocate who has devoted his entire career to helping teachers gain a better understanding of the importance of an education in and through the arts. Trained as a music educator, he is respected nationally and internationally as an innovator for effective programs in Arts Education, and is considered to be a leader in his field. Eric taught elementary music for several years, served as Coordinator for Arts Education with the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board, and spent the last six years of his career as Arts Education Consultant for the Nova Scotia Department of Education. He has taught undergraduate and graduate education courses at several Canadian universities, and in 2011 he was appointed as Visiting Fellow to the Ministry of Education in Singapore. In that capacity he has served as an advisor for teacher development in music education. He has published extensively and he actively participates in research projects on current educational issues with colleagues around the world. Now retired from public education, Eric operates his consulting firm, Artscape Consulting Ltd. and for the past several years he has built a vibrant business that focuses on training, research, and development.
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Angela Elster Ms. Elster, one of Canada’s preeminent Arts & Learning executives, is currently the Vice President, Vancouver Symphony Orchestra School of Music and Community Programs. Following three decades of leadership, most recently as Senior Vice President of The Royal Conservatory where she launched ‘Learning Through the Arts’ in addition to many other successful education and wellness programs. She has held leadership positions with the Coalition for Music Education and the Canadian Network for Arts and Learning and currently leads several Canadian creative projects. She holds a Bachelor of Music from the University of Toronto, an MA from OISE and the Certificate of Leadership in Expressive Arts from the European Graduate School where she is in the process of completing her PhD. She brings to organizations demonstrated expertise in teaching, research, curriculum development, government relations, fundraising and strategic planning. Central to all of her work is the creativity, inspiration, excellent quality, depth, and joy she learned through her music education and music teaching. Angela was awarded one of Canada’s highest honors – the Meritorious Service Medal from the Right Honourable David Johnston, former Governor General of Canada recognizing outstanding accomplishments that set an example and bring benefit to our country.
Pan-Canada
2:30 - 3:30pm
Themes: Social Justice; Arts Education in Schools; Inclusivity
Music for Social Justice: Impacts of an El Sistema After-School Orchestral Program in Manitoba A large extant research literature shows that participation in arts programs correlates with improved academic and social outcomes for students who live in challenging circumstances. In this session, findings are reported from a longitudinal research study of an El Sistema-inspired after school orchestral program implemented in two Canadian urban school communities. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected in multiple forms: interviews, focus groups, student assessments, surveys, observations, and institutional records. Evidence of positive program influences and challenges will be presented in response to research questions examining: program impacts on children’s development, program impacts on partnering institutions, program impacts on community, pedagogical features and program methods, and overall program assessment and opportunities. A small ensemble of young musicians participating in the program will perform. Representative voices from partnering institutions, teaching staff, and students will share personal reflections about what participating in the program means to them.
El Sistema or The System in English is a national music for social change program founded by José Antonio Abreu in 1975 in Venezuela (Abreu, 2009; Tunstall, 2012). Leaders of the program offer impoverished youth free instruments and music education as an alternative to gangs, drug dealing, and violent crime. Rehearsals and instructional experiences are scheduled from one to four hours a day, five or six days a week. Teaching musicians employ unique pedagogical approaches that also emphasize social learning. Akin to the Venezuelan programs, the after-school orchestral program examined in this study aims to inspire children who deserve additional care and attention in our community and positively impact their lives and the community more wholly. Recommendations will be made for how school divisions in other cities around the world can partner with cultural institutions to launch similar after-school music programs aligned with El Sistema core values and pedagogical principles.
Presenters:
Francine Morin, PhD Dr. Francine Morin, an authority in Canadian arts education, teaches and conducts educational research. She works with institutional partners studying the impacts of Sistema Winnipeg on children’s development and more.
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Representative Program Participants Winnipeg, MB
Design and Transform Kindergarten to Grade 12 Learning Spaces with the Arts: A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies The objectives of the in-progress critical participatory action research study presented in this session are to:
  • Identify and analyze current approaches and promising practices for designing and implementing quality learning spaces with the arts in a critical pedagogy of multiliteracies in Kindergarten to Grade 12 (K-12) schools in Manitoba;
  • Develop, evaluate, and implement a conceptual model or models for this design.

Multiliteracies are defined as a "range of literacies and literate practices used in all facets of life" (Bull & Anstey, 2019, p. 6). As learners move into the third decade of the 21st century, ways of perceiving, knowing, and communicating understandings about the world are multiple, diverse, and use a range of multimodal texts and literacies that include the arts. The arts provide rich and unique pathways, modes, and media for engaging learners, for supporting reconciliation, and for promoting mental and physical health and well being in all subject areas and grade levels.
This study examines strategies and implementation approaches that will help to ensure the survival and flourishing of artistic learning in K-12 contexts, and explores the potential and role of the arts to enrich and transform K-12 learning spaces. Learning designs incorporating the arts in a critical pedagogy of multiliteracies will expand opportunities for equitable and innovative safe learning spaces in Manitoba schools leading to a more democratic society for all.
The central question of this critical participatory action research is: “How can we design and transform K-12 learning spaces with the arts using a critical pedagogy of multiliteracies?” The research question is explored in collaboration with co-researchers, artist-consultants, generalist and specialist K-12 educators, and K-12 learners. Session participants will be invited to also share their suggestions and considerations for promising practices for designing learning spaces with the arts using a critical pedagogy of multiliteracies.
Presenters:
Beryl Peters Beryl has enjoyed a rich career in arts education, recently as Arts Education Consultant for Manitoba Education. She is currently Director of School Experiences for the Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba.
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Julie Mongeon-Ferré Throughout her 30 year music teaching career Julie enjoyed integrating technology and different art disciplines. Since 2011, she has been an Arts Education Consultant with the Manitoba Bureau de l'éducation française.
Winnipeg, MB
Themes: Health & Well-Being; Community Partnerships
First we Heal the Artist On May 3 2016, the Horse River Wildfire caused 88,000. people in town of Fort McMurray to be evacuated. 2,579 properties were destroyed. One month later the rebuild began and it is still ongoing.Three years later, hundreds of people are still waiting to get back in their homes. As the rebuild began, there was and continues to be pressure on artists to contribute to community healing. Unfortunately, many had lost homes studios, art supplies, instruments, equipment and entire bodies of work. They need to be healed before they can help in the community healing.
In August of 2017, the Art Recovery Working Group began the process of developing an Arts Recovery Strategic Plan. In August of 2018 Red Cross provided 2 years funding for an Arts Recovery Coordinator to work for Arts Council to implement the Strategic Plan.The goal, to create opportunities for artists to collaborate and heal through their arts, thereby enabling them to support recovery and resiliency in our community.
The impact of the Wild Fire on the Arts was profound and further complicated by the additional pressure on a struggling Arts Community. The implementation of the strategic plan is essential to the survival and growth of the Arts and the well being of the community as a whole.
Presenter:
Sharon Heading Sharon has been a resident of Fort McMurray for 17 years. She comes from a background in Not-for-profit as a Special Event Organizer and as a Real estate Agent. The past 4 years she has combined those talents to do contract work in the Arts sector. Sharon is a respected member of the local Arts Community and exhibits regularly in the community. She is vice chair of the Public Art Committee, past President of the Wood Buffalo Arts Foundation and past coordinator of Learning Through The Arts. She is a passionate community volunteer committed to keeping the Arts front and center in the community.
Fort McMurray, AB
Far From the Heart / Loin du Coeur Far From the Heart / Loin du Coeur (FFTH): a sexual violence prevention program. Sheatre’s award-winning interactive play is at the heart of this program that provides safe spaces for kids to talk and learn about sexual assault, consent and teen dating violence, often for the first time.
Interactive theatre lets youth play out their strategies for changing problematic situations. Follow-up discussions led by community service partners deepen their learning. These crucial conversations prepare them with skills and insights to develop safe, consensual sexual relationships, and access support when needed. A recent study by Students Commission of Canada confirms: "FFTH improves resiliency by equipping young people with improved knowledge of their community resources and increased understanding of gender-based violence and how to identify it in their community.”
We’ve responded to young people’s curiosity and questions prior to, during and after “Me Too”. One thing has remained the same every year: kids want to talk about it. And they say FFTH is “awesome”.
Since 2006, FFTH has reached 29,500 people in live audiences primarily in small urban and rural schools across Ontario and Saskatchewan. Plans are afoot for a tour of Atlantic Canada in 2020.
We’re always seeking for ways for FFTH to stay relevant and engage a wider audience.
Delivery strategies now include live theatre touring, an online film, a digital/live hybrid, and live streaming -- each one meeting with difficult challenges due to shifting political agendas, union rules, educational policies, mental health protocols, economics, and even the need to design digital technology to do the job. It’s not easy to do this work, but we’re passionate, inspired and love to do it.
Sheatre is a community-engaged arts organization that specializes in Forum Theatre, with over 33 years of experience in creating and presenting interactive, issue-oriented theatre and the arts.
Presenter:
Joan Chandler JOAN CHANDLER (Producer, director, writer, facilitator) specializes in Forum Theatre and community arts. She has a keen ability with groups, spinning new plays with, by and about their own stories.
Kemble, ON
Themes: Community Partnerships; Equitable Access to Arts & Learning
Culture Days: exploring well-being through participatory programming Culture Days is a national celebration of arts and culture. At the end of each September, millions of people attend thousands of free participatory arts and culture events across the country. Culture Days programs invite the public to get hands-on and behind-the-scenes to highlight the importance of arts and culture in our communities.
To mark the 10-year anniversary of the national initiative, Culture Days has a theme for 2019 called Creativity, the Arts, and Well-being. This presentation will provide an overview of the year-round communications campaign driving this theme: across social media, we’ve been sharing our own data and wide-ranging research, ideas, and stories involving the many ways arts and culture are connected to the well-being of individuals and the vitality of our communities; our webinar series hosted experts in the field presenting their research into the impacts of the arts on well-being such as Dr. Daisy Fancourt, from the BBC’s Get Creative Festival, who delved into her research results from produced from the Great British Creativity Test; our special blog series delved into the theme by profiling organizations doing work in related fields; and our video series profiles personal stories of how arts engagement has had profound impacts on these individuals’ well-being.
From this national communications campaign, thousands of grassroots organizers picked up the challenge to organize Culture Days events that could encourage or stimulate greater physical or mental well-being either for individuals or their community at large. This presentation will highlight some of the exemplary events that arose from within the theme, such as: “Rise up Singing: Music as Medicine; Songs that Heal” a community choral workshop presented by Deep Roots Music Festival in Wolfville, Nova Scotia; and “Landscape Dancers”, a dance performance at St. Boniface Hospital by Artists in Healthcare Manitoba, as well as many others We will close out the presentation with our latest research from the annual Culture Days public survey, revealing brand new statistics of the public’s perceptions of the links between arts and well-being.
Presenter:
Aubrey Reeves Aubrey Reeves is a Toronto-based artist and arts manager. Involved with Culture Days since it launched in 2010, she first led the initiative in Ontario and subsequently was named National Executive Director in 2017.
Toronto, ON
How Intermediary Organizations are Supporting Rural Arts Education Rural communities across Canada are exploring the potential of the arts in promoting local sustainability and wellbeing. Central to achieving this goal is public access to high-quality arts education. However, educational opportunities can be limited in remote areas, prompting the need for strategies that build capacity within rural systems. Cross-sector and interdisciplinary partnerships are known to strengthen social systems, such as education. Research has further emphasized the role of intermediary organizations (IOs) that broker value-exchange partnerships between these different professional parties. IOs have scarcely been examined in the context of arts education, and less so in rural arts education. Thus, the purpose of my doctoral research is to investigate how a range of partnerships are formed through IOs to strengthen rural arts education and promote positive change for all stakeholders involved. This presentation will highlight emergent findings from interviews with five IOs working with rural communities in Quebec and Ontario.
Presenter:
Tiina Kukkonen Tiina Kukkonen is a visual artist, experienced arts educator, and PhD candidate in the Faculty of Education at Queen's University. Her publications in academic journals, practitioner magazines, and online forums aim to influence policy and practice in arts education. Her interest in rural arts education stems from her experiences living and working in rural and northern communities.
Kingston, ON
Themes: Social Justice & Reconciliation; Arts & Learning in Schools
Culture City Youth: Redefining experiential education Culture City Youth (CCY) is an innovative experiential education program that infuses an arts and cultural inflection with curriculum frameworks. CCY was created by, and is currently administrated through the auspices of the London Arts Council (LAC). Funded by the London Community Foundation and the Ontario Trillium Foundation, CCY recently concluded its third year with over 1500 student participants. In this regard, the LAC has worked closely with both the public and the Catholic school boards to ensure that student and teacher needs and interests are met.
The purpose of CCY is to bring a diverse range of community members together - such as artists (visual, dance, theatrical and musical), historians, business owners, politicians, environmental specialists, philanthropic leaders, social activists, Indigenous story tellers and Indigenous artists/small business owners – as a means to teach students about the different kinds of cultures that not only co-exist, but in many ways, intersect, within the socio-economic-political landscape of London Ontario. In doing so, CCY entails a carefully planned week-long experience that allows students to discover and learn at many different settings, including the Ark Aid Mission (soup kitchen), Bakers Dozen (local artisan collective), City Hall, TAP center for creativity, Reforest London (non-profit environmental organization), Growing Chefs (non-profit food incubator), the Forks of the Thames (local historical landmark), the London Music Hall of Fame, O.N.E. dance studio, and the London Clay Art Center (non-profit arts collective).
A recent CCY program evaluation indicated that student participants gained a significant increase in their understanding of civic responsibility and community engagement. Moreover, this program evaluation indicated that student participants significantly increased their interest in career potentialities within the arts, community organization, government and politics. The general findings of the evaluation indicated that the Culture City Youth program empowered student participants to envision and enact positive change in both present and future situations.
Presenter:
Jeremy Jeresky Jeremy Jeresky is the Curator of Public Programs and Learning at the London Arts Council. He has an extensive back ground in community art practice and research.
London, ON
Spoken Words. Open Hearts Dwayne Morgan has been a full time practitioner of the spoken word for the past twenty-six years, twenty-one of those being spent working with students. Today, Morgan has formal partnerships with three school boards, and has created a spoken word league with two of them. Through these leagues, over 300 students per year get to experience the power that comes from standing in their truth, sharing who they are, and learning first hand about their peers. This initiative happens without the support of any arts organizations, but instead by lobbying the school boards to see the power in youth voice, and the various curriculum connections.
Presenter:
Dwayne Morgan Dwayne Morgan is a multi award winning Spoken Word Artist and Educator from the Toronto Region. In 2013, Morgan was inducted to the Scarborough (Ontario) Walk of Fame.
Toronto, ON
Themes: International Perspectives; Post-Secondary Arts & Learning
Studying a painting: analyses of curators for observers and machines Curators analyse paintings to describe the expressive intentions of the author, subjects, and techniques. Their analyses include concepts that are connected to other entities in the world.
The Semantic Web is a collection of techniques that makes the content on the Web understandable by machines. They form a Giant Global Graph of knowledge that can be queried by people.
Our project aims to create the tools to publish works of curators with such technologies. Observers will read the analysis of different curators and critics; links to learn more about the concepts will be available. Because our formal knowledge representation model considers parts of a painting, queries such as `what do the hands in the middle of The Creation Of Adam represent?' can be answered. Descriptions of a picture will also be accessible clicking on parts of the published images. Also, using augmented reality, visitors could retrieve information simply by looking at a part of the picture. As a result, our system will improve understanding and scholarship in the fine arts. As the first application of our model, we will publish analyses of the Miss Chief's Wet Dream by Kent Monkman. A prototype will be also introduced.
Presenter:
Nicola Raffaele Di Matteo Nicola Raffaele Di Matteo. Ph.D. student at Dalhousie University. Working on Semantic Web Ontologies and Frameworks, Segmentation Software and Time Machine Interfaces.
Halifax, NS
The Past, Present, and Future: Ballroom Dance in Chinese Tertiary Institutions The provision of ballroom dance within tertiary education in China arguably has a large impact on the ballroom dance industry locally and internationally. The aim of this research is to better understand how to educate students who major in ballroom dance in Chinese universities. I am particularly interested in Chinese ballroom dance teachers' meanings of curriculum, pedagogy, future trends, learners' needs, and the place of ballroom dance education within a rapidly changing society. In this presentation I will outline a brief history of how ballroom dance was introduced to China and then within Chinese universities. This presentation will also outline several key issues emerging from the interviews in this study. I hope that the findings arising from this research will improve the sustainability of ballroom dance education and practices within formal and informal education (UNESCO) contexts in China.
Presenters:
Longqi Yu Longqi Yu (Johnny) is a PhD candidate at the University of Auckland. After completing his dual masters (two degrees) from Beijing Dance Academy (BDA) and University of Auckland, he was awarded the BDA Academic Excellence Award. Longqi is the first and only competitor from China and Asia to win the gold medal at the 53rd Junior Blackpool Dance Championship (2010) in the UK. He was a member of the Chinese DanceSport National Olympic Team.
New Zealand
Themes: International Perspectives
Sharing Ideas on Sustainable Development for Arts Education Index (SAEI) Based on Seoul Agenda The purpose of this study is to develop an international index based on the Seoul Agenda: Development of Art Education, which was proclaimed at the 2nd World Cultural Arts Education Conference in February 2010. The Sustainable development for Arts Education Index (SAEI), is thus designed to measure the achievements of arts education after the declaration of the Seoul Agenda; not only the progress of South Korea after the declaration, but also that of other countries. The Korean version of the SAEI Index were calculated in the years 2011, 2014, and 2017; and shows some important findings and implications. The major finding of this study can be summarized as the necessity of efforts to improve the quality of arts education, considering the aftermath of the quantitative expansion in arts education programs, supports, and participants in Korea.
Presenter:
InSul Kim InSul Kim is an associate professor of Graduate School of Culture at Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea; and is interested in the arts can as an alternative form to reflect social problems, initiate civic engagement, and produce social capital.
South Korea
The challenge of arts & cultural education for a diverse and post-agreement country
Presenter:
Gloria Zapata Restrepo
Colombia
Digital Strategy Consultation - A
Members of the Canadian Network for Arts & Learning’s Digital Strategy team, along with Peter Skillen and Laurie Biderman, will facilitate discussions on creating a pan-Canadian inclusive digital strategy for the future of the arts and learning sector.
4:00 - 5:00pm
Themes: Arts & Learning in the Digital Age; International Perspectives
Digitalization and arts education: Recent research perspectives and outcomes Digitalization and mobile connectivity have changed our worlds in an unprecedented way. The distinctions of online versus offline, cyberspace versus meatspace, or even "real" world versus "virtual" world, are obsolete. In this context, arts education is of particular relevance: The digital transformation of our world requires new cultural techniques. The talk will first offer a more comprehensive view upon digitality and digitalization, regarding (cultural) historical as well as well as systematic perspectives. Secondly, the necessity of arts education to understand, as well as its capability to contribute to a more empowering digital culture will be located on the three layers of 1) a necessity to adapt to post-digital youth culture, 2) the chance and responsibility of arts education to contribute to an inclusive and all-encompassing development towards (post) digital education, and 3) the significance and potential of the discourses of arts related to the digital transformation of culture and society.
Presenter:
Benjamin Jörissen Dr. Benjamin Jörissen is Chairholder of the Chair of Education with a focus on Culture and Aesthetics at Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg. The Chair's research aims to contribute to an understanding of the role of aesthetic, arts and cultural education in a transforming and diverse world.
Elke Möller Elke Möller is a research associate at the Department of Education with a Focus on Culture and Aesthetics and pursues a PhD in Media Studies at the Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany). She currently coordinates the meta-research project »Digitalization in Arts and Cultural Education«.
Friederike Schmiedl Friederike Schmiedl works as a research assistant in the meta-research project »Digitalization in Arts and Cultural Education« at the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany). In addition, she is a PhD candidate at the Department of Education with a Focus on Culture and Aesthetics.
Germany
Rediscovering arts and learning in the digital age: A reflection on what we explored Recently, various plans have been established at the national policy level in response to technology from the arts point of view in South Korea. Learning about the changes in arts learning was one of the key focus areas in 2018. KACES took a new step forward in various ways focusing on: new content development, re-traininJg artist group, and discovering discourses. Among many initiatives, an international symposium and an 'art+tech+education' forum were hosted to share diverse practices; research and a survey were conducted to suggest a new model, frame and directions to the new program; several art-tech integrated training programs were developed and introduced to teaching artists and school teachers, and; new educational contents were developed to tackle distance learning through VR and AR. By highlighting what we tried and experienced through such a new exploration throughout the year, this presentation will reflect process, learning and impact of the projects.
Presenters:
Jahyun Kim Jahyun Kim joined the Korea Arts & Culture Education Service in 2005, its founding year. She has been establishing solid platform for sustainable arts and culture education as the director of the Educational Affairs Division.
&
Hyejin Yang Hyejin Yang is a program coordinator for the International Affairs Team of the Korea Arts and Culture Education Service, a public agency within the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of Korea.
Korea
Themes: Health & WellBeing; Inclusivity; Working with Children & Youth
Students’ Experiences of Physical Disability in Secondary School Drama Education This presentation will provide an overview of ongoing research that examines students' experiences of physical disability in secondary school drama education. For this multiple case study research (Stake, 2010), data collection involved three semi-structured interviews with each of the five participants, who described their memories of their high school drama experiences. Data were thematically analyzed through a process of inductive open coding. The results include descriptions of themes that emerged as significant to the participants' experiences.
Presenter:
Nissa Sills Nissa Sills is a master's student researcher with a background in drama education and its intersection with physical disability.
Kingston, ON
Learning English in colour: A multi-modal approach to language teaching The therapeutic power of the arts has wide-reaching potential for language teachers and learners. English Language Learners (ELLs) face challenges not only of learning a new language, but also navigating personal and family struggles, negotiating unfamiliar cultural contexts, and dealing with academic or workplace content. Many carry memories of traumatic experiences.
In the field of teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) it is common to speak of using a variety of learning styles. While music, drama and story-telling have been recognized as effective tools in the language classroom, the use of visual art has received little attention. Very often only lip-service is paid to multi-modal practices in language classrooms.
Research in expressive arts indicates important links between language, images, sensory-motor experiences and memory. In this workshop the presenters give participants a hands-on introduction to research in using expressive arts to enhance language development and personal growth.
  1. An adult program for newcomers with interrupted schooling offers “English in Color”, experimenting with multiple modalities.
  2. International students in a Canadian university participate in weekly “English through Art” sessions.
  3. An education course for pre-service English teachers explores “Expressive Arts as Pedagogy.

Preliminary findings suggest that integrating expressive arts engages learners at a deeper level than using just words. Through art-based tasks, learners engage in complex thought processes often barred from expression by limited language proficiency and lack of connection to cultural identity. Creating art contributes to reduced language learning anxiety and creates a motivating learning environment for rich language development. Through accessing creative parts of their brains, learners hone critical thinking skills and expand their imagination. Drawing from the principles of expressive arts therapy, multiple intelligences, and motivational theory, the presenter suggests both theoretical principles and practical techniques that could benefit many language teachers and learners.
Presenters:
Elfrieda Lepp-Kaethler Elfrieda Lepp-Kaethler (Ph.D. Associate Professor of TESOL, Providence University College, ExArts Diploma WHEAT) works as a language teacher educator and is researching the role of visual art in language learning. &
Youn Sun Park Youn Sun Park (B. A. Art Therapy, TESOL Cert.) is a TESOL student at Providence University College where she is combinging her passion for art therapy and English language teaching.
Otterburne, MB
Themes: Mental Health & Wellbeing; Working With Youth; Vulnerability & Expression
Vulnerability & the Arts: Humanity’s Secret Superpower – an interactive mini-workshop A team-enhancing workshop in which participants experience the power of collaboration and cooperation which will dynamically influence how they interact with each other in the day to day work environment.
The process encourages participants to embrace creative challenges while building an appreciation for the collaborative process.
Story Planet is a creative non-profit that empowers young Torontonians to make and share their stories. Our expert artists, writers, and volunteers provide young people – particularly those from communities lacking in resources – with experiences that build strong communication skills while fostering self-worth and a sense of belonging. Our programs are inspired by the U.S. based 826 writing centers co-founded by best-selling author David Eggers.
Story Planet is a creative non-profit that empowers young Torontonians to make and share their stories. Our expert artists, writers, and volunteers provide young people – particularly those from communities lacking in resources – with experiences that build strong communication skills while fostering self-worth and a sense of belonging. Our programs are inspired by the U.S. based 826 writing centers co-founded by best-selling author David Eggers.
Presenter:
David Hurlow Dave Hurlow is a Story Wizard, freelance writer and musician. He is currently playing bass and singing in Andrew La Tona & The Nightshades and working on his first novel, Deep Sea Feline.
Toronto, ON
Themes: Health & Well-Being; Arts & Learning for Youth and Children
Using Puppets to Encourage the Awareness and Facilitate the Discussion of Mental Health and Wellness Issues W.P. Puppet Theatre Society (WPTS) seeks to spark curiosity; provide understanding about the world we live in; examine the issues of our time; consider solutions and inspire our audiences to become active, ethical and involved citizens through puppetry.
We do this through innovative and explorative puppetry arts:
  • Producing and performing original shows which tour throughout Alberta transforming school gyms and community centres into theatres with our lights, sound and stunning sets.
  • Presenting a wide range of learning experiences and professional development, through, in and about puppetry, in schools and community events for children and adults. (300 average hours per year)
  • Actively participating and promoting a wide variety of community engagement projects building connections and social capital.
  • Annually reaching over 5,000 people at over 150 events.

Our most recent strategic plan identified three strategic priorities: Redefine Puppetry, Increase Visibility and Foster Collaborations.
Presenter:
Wendy Passmore-Godfrey Wendy Passmore-Godfrey is the Artistic Director and Founder of WP Puppet Theatre. In 1986, Wendy received her BFA from the University of Calgary and has since exhibited and performed her work nationally and internationally.
Calgary, AB
Bilingual Session
Themes: TBA
Les sommets et les creux dans les organismes artistiques Fondateur du Théâtre à Pic, Inouk Touzin a mené l'organisme depuis sa fondation, en 2010, jusqu'à sa démission du poste de directeur artistique et général à l'été 2018. Retrouvez Inouk qui nous parlera de ses expériences à la tête du TàP et les défis qui ont entravé le développement de cette jeune compagnie de théâtre. Nous explorerons comment les limites du bénévolat, du développement communautaire et du financement public peuvent porter préjudice malgré un intérêt marqué pour les services et activités de la compagnie. Nous verrons les forces sur le terrain, ainsi que les lacunes qui ont entravé la route de l'initiative. Cette session sera un témoignage vécu, présenté comme données factuelles dont on peut tirer des leçons.
Presenter:
Inouk Touzin Inouk Touzin est un artiste théâtral polyvalent qui détient un MFA en mise en scène de l'Université de Calgary. Il a oeuvré au Théâtre à Pic et a contribué à l’essor d'une centaine d'institutions canadiennes depuis les 20 dernières années.
Calgary, AB
Themes: Arts & Learning in Elementary School; International Perspectives
Performing Arts and Learning: Reflections on the Presence of Children in Plays for Adults This paper reflects on the political and ethical issues concerning the presence of children as actors in contemporary theatre. The strong effect caused by the appearance of children on the stage is almost a consensus in the theatre community, however little is said about the effects of children’s participation in plays with adult themes from the point of view of the child actor. The paper approaches contemporary theatre experiences in which children participate in international productions of plays with themes such as death, sex and violence. The questions that emerge from these experiences are: What does it mean to make theatre with children and the power structures that are at play when doing this? Is it possible to establish egalitarian relationships in theatrical productions with adults and children, or will it always be a one-sided power relationship? Are death, sex, violence, war and disease “adult themes”? Can the theatre be a safe place for children to learn and think about sensitive subjects such as loss, grief, submission and love? Can the embodied presence of children in theatre be an act of resistance against the invisibilization of their bodies and the silencing of their voices? This work is particularly focused in the political dimensions of childhood and in learning practices and theories which recognize children and young people as social agents of change.
Presenter:
Melissa Ferreira Melissa Ferreira, PhD, is a researcher at The State University of Campinas in São Paulo, Brazil. Fellow of The São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP).
Brazil
Performing arts experiences for children with complex needs The Arts have the potential to break through the barriers and limitations which participants with neurological, physical and cognitive challenges have to contend with. Performing Arts experiences based on sensory exploration can wire the neural connections between the brain and the sensory organs.
The importance of sensory exploration is often well-understood and regarded as necessary in the care of children with severe and multiple disabilities but caregivers very often, through feelings of anxiety, low self-esteem and lack of training, resort to ‘parking’ children in their care. Children are placed in sensory stimulating environments but with no active engagement and interaction or attention paid to truly engaging with their charges. Caregivers are often exhausted, unsure and anxious. Children who rely on the sensory and non-linguistic means of communication are often very aware of this and pick up on their anxiety or disinterest. One on one interaction is required to truly engage in meaningful experiences and this is often lacking.
This study documents the creation of a sensory space for children with severe and multiple disabilities to encourage mindful personal and group glow experiences as they engage in a sensory journey and exploration of the space. Through the use of repetition and a sense of ritual, children are invited into a world encouraging mindful engagement. The project attempts to not only focus on the experience of the participants but also to invite caregivers into engagement and provide them with skills to continue similar experiences.
Presenter:
Margot Wood Margot Wood is a theatre-maker and lecturer in Educational Drama and Theatre at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology in Cape Town, South Africa.
South Africa
Themes: Mental Health & Well-Being; Working with Children/Vulnerable People
Digital Sound Design in the Elementary Music Class: Potential and Pitfalls This session will present a potential model for a pedagogy of creation and discuss its application to a sound design project in a middle school in Winnipeg, Canada, and to an integrated arts project at a conservatory in Montbéliad, France. Canadian visual arts scholar Pierre Gosselin’s model for creation served as a guide for both projects. While both endeavours were framed using aspects of the model and used the same iPad applications as a platform for creating, the Winnipeg project presented several pitfalls related to the context and allotted timeframe which will be shared. In addition to a discussion of Gosselin’s model and the potential and pitfalls we experienced in engaging students in digital sound design and creating, this session will also introduce several iPad applications and discuss their potential use in the arts classroom.
Presenter:
Dr. Jody Stark Jody Stark is an Assistant Professor in Music Education at the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba and Gaja Maffezzoli is a composer and professor at the Conservatoire de Montbéliard. They were brought together by this project
Winnipeg, MB
Exploring a Comparative Musics Model Towards an Anti-Racist Music Education “The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.”
-Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
In spite of Canada’s enormous racial and cultural diversity, colonialist representations of Canadian identity are reflected in the repertoire commonly available and taught in early years music classrooms. This presentation reports on a collaborative project between a school division and a university researcher to explore a potential model for de-centering colonialist narratives about music and creating an anti-racist pedagogy in the music classroom. The participants in this study are working together to implement a Comparative Musics Model and to discover what this might look like in their own classrooms. The study seeks to respond to the following research questions:
  1. In what ways do current models of early years music reinforce an Anglo- and Euro-centric understanding of music?
  2. What might a Comparative Musics Model approach to teaching music look like for early years music programs?
  3. What kinds of teaching resources would be helpful and needed in supporting such an approach?
Presenters:
Dr. Jody Stark Jody Stark is an Assistant Professor in Music Education at the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba and Gaja Maffezzoli is a composer and professor at the Conservatoire de Montbéliard. They were brought together by this project
Winnipeg, MB

Friday, October 25

Grand Learning Space
Simultaneous Interpretation

The Arts Ascend Room

Transforming Communities Room

Empowering Young People Room

Innovation in Collaboration Room

International Perspectives Room

The Power of Arts Education Room

11:00am - 12:00pm
Themes: TBA
Building Cultural and Linguistic Identity through the Arts Building Cultural and Linguistic Identity through the Arts
The arts are essential in creating and maintaining cultural and linguistic identity. In Manitoba, francophones, Metis, and French-speaking newcomers live in a minority context. Despite the minority context, our vibrant francophone community flourishes, has a voice, affirms itself and contributes to the vitality of Manitoba. These artistic, cultural and linguistic perspectives, strengths and challenges will be shared and discussed at this panel.
Bâtir l’identité culturelle et linguistique par le biais des arts
Les arts sont essentiels à la création et au maintien de l'identité culturelle et linguistique. Au Manitoba, les francophones de souche, les Métis et les nouveaux arrivants parlant français vivent dans un contexte minoritaire. Malgré ce contexte minoritaire, notre communauté dynamique s'épanouit, trouve sa voix, s'affirme et contribue à la vitalité du Manitoba. Ces perspectives, ses forces et ses défis artistiques, culturels et linguistiques seront partagés et discutés lors de cette table ronde.
Panelists:
Gabriel Tougas Hailing from Winnipeg, Gabriel Tougas is French-language film and television director. His work includes the investigative drama Exposing Héliosols, and the feature documentary Cela était notre message, exploring young Manitoban francophones’ identities. In his work and life, his interests include environmentalism, cultural identity, citizen engagement and wide open spaces.
Eric Plamondon
Genevieve Pelletier Geneviève Pelletier est une comédienne et metteure en scène canadienne de Winnipeg. Depuis 2012, elle est à la barre de la direction artistique du Théâtre Cercle Molière qui célèbre en 2019 ses 94 ans d’existence, la plus ancienne troupe de théâtre du pays. Elle s’intéresse aux croisements des cultures et des multiples possibilités s’ouvrant dans ce monde qui devient de plus en plus petit, provoquant des espaces de création fertiles et complexes.
Geneviève Pelletier is a Canadian actor and theater director from Winnipeg. She took over the reins of Canada’s oldest running theater (since 1925), le Théâtre Cercle Molière in 2012. She is interested in nurturing fertile creative spaces that include all cultures and voices.
Roxane Dupuis
Themes: Social Justice & Reconciliation; Art-Making
Dance as a Decolonizing Process: A Radical Praxis for Embodiment This experiential workshop explores the dynamic efforts of lucidity and mindfulness, as a conjunctive process of somatic imagination, as a radical effort to (re)experience dance from an interior sensitivity of presence and history. To situate this embodied inquiry, a personal practice of Butoh Dance will be a focus.
Workshop participants will be introduced to psychosomatics, historical knowledge regarding the origins, foundations, and global developments of Butoh dance, actively participate in an investigation of re-creating their own narrative through somatic experiencing. (e.g., dance improvisation, choreography, poetic writing), and will experience a process towards re-indigenizing dance education.
Presenter:
Tanja Faylene Woloshen Tanja Faylene Woloshen BA Hon MFA BEd
Dance Artist/ Educator. Performs across N.A., & EU. Recent: Dance Studies Association Conference, Leimay NYC, YLDE AiR, “A Short History of Crazy Bone”, “Holy Wild”, IEATA Conference. Teaching: WHEAT, ULethbridge, UWinnipeg, and UBC-O.
Winnipeg, MB
Art beyond the bush… Over 20 years ago traveling in Latin America with her husband to be, on a boat looking into the barren landscape at the Straits of Magellan furthest South you can travel Heather Shillinglaw a Cree/Denesuline Appetogasan found her muse.
Her ongoing teachings she relies on family members, knowledge keepers, elders and historians, archivists, inclusive of the sweatlodge sometimes unexpected nommatic learning styles. Her desire is that the ‘arts’ practice to bring art beyond the bush ‘Miyo Wahkohtowin’- ‘good way’. Her studies include examining collections of Alberta Archives, Canadian Archives, Hudson Bay Archives… to get the historical picture of what change happened within her family histories and how they collided with history in the making of Canada. Information harvest built current traveling exhibition ‘ Whiskey Scrip’ and other works in progress.
Apikosos- mouse her animal spirit mouse guides her to scurry collection of materials to produce artwork, art-quilts, sculpture, installation & public art. Moving forward from the bush Shillinglaw aspires an underlining message of MEAM Metis Ecological Arts Message and the 4 r’s ‘waste in our world’ the message incorporated deeper meanings to protect what is left for future generations.
The Canadian Embassies abroad in South America, invitation to work with Anthologists artists and speaking engagments. Traveling juncture nommatic learning of Maputches, and Tobian-Guaranian Medicine women in Paraguay and Argentina. Teaching art programs at Unicef School workshops, and lecture based a exchanges of plants knowledge that replaces pharmacy.
Combined with these experiences and studio expressions she develops her artistic message to be a part of her own journey with Reconciliation sharing her art to educate land-based learning. Shillinglaw is currently employed at the Art Gallery of St Alberta as the Indigenious Visual Arts Programmer and current traveling exhibition is in Waneskewin Gallery Saskatoon, Saskatechewan and MUSE Douglas Family Art Centre Kenora, Ontario.
Presenter:
Heather Shillinglaw ‘Shillinglaw is a guest speaker, presenter, educator, curator, world traveller and an advocate for women and the challenges they face, Shillinglaw’s artwork has been a part of private and corporate collections across Canada for the past two decades. A devoted wife and a nurturing mother, working with in her community locally of all ages and globally; her artwork has been exhibited in numerous art galleries around the country and she’s taken her work and her wisdom beyond Canada’s borders to places that include Paraguay, Argentina, and Budapest among others.’
John Copley Writer Alberta Native News.
Edmonton, AB
Themes: Social Justice; Mental Health & Well-Being
Transforming early childhood through music Transforming Early Childhood Education Through Music is an innovative project that aims to offer accessible professional development to early childhood educators while delivering music sessions based on the Early Years Program of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra School of Music. The overarching goal is to increase the presence of music education in Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) facilities, ensuring that high-quality music learning is available to babies and young children of Vancouver and the Lower Mainland. The project (i) provides music sessions lead by professional Early Childhood Music Educators (ECMEs) in five different ELCC; (ii) proposes pedagogical innovation to the VSO School of Music’s Early Years Program; (iii) offers professional development to Early Childhood Educators (ECEs); and, (iv) creates digital music tools to improve the engagement of educators and parents with children. During this session, we offer an overview of the project discussing its pedagogical innovations, community engagement emphasis, and organizational design. Discussing current positive technological transformations, we present the Early Childhood Education Resources, a digital toolkit formed by videos and a new picture book created to support parents and teachers in their musical activities with young children. Finally, presenting evidence of the positive impact of the project, we argue that programs as the Transforming Early Childhood Education Through Music are crucial to guarantee that every Canadian child has his/her learning rights preserved, contributing in this way to the development of a more democratic society through arts and learning.
Presenters:
Caroline Brendel Pacheco Caroline Brendel Pacheco is a Brazilian music educator and scholar, interested in music education, childhood development, and anti-racism education. She is currently a PhD Candidate at Simon Fraser University.
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Angela Elster Ms. Elster, one of Canada’s preeminent Arts & Learning executives, is currently the Vice President, Vancouver Symphony Orchestra School of Music and Community Programs. Following three decades of leadership, most recently as Senior Vice President of The Royal Conservatory where she launched ‘Learning Through the Arts’ in addition to many other successful education and wellness programs. She has held leadership positions with the Coalition for Music Education and the Canadian Network for Arts and Learning and currently leads several Canadian creative projects. She holds a Bachelor of Music from the University of Toronto, an MA from OISE and the Certificate of Leadership in Expressive Arts from the European Graduate School where she is in the process of completing her PhD. She brings to organizations demonstrated expertise in teaching, research, curriculum development, government relations, fundraising and strategic planning. Central to all of her work is the creativity, inspiration, excellent quality, depth, and joy she learned through her music education and music teaching. Angela was awarded one of Canada’s highest honors – the Meritorious Service Medal from the Right Honourable David Johnston, former Governor General of Canada recognizing outstanding accomplishments that set an example and bring benefit to our country.
Vancouver, BC
Manitoba Theatre for Young People and Native Youth Theatre Manitoba Theatre for Young People (MTYP) has been creating and presenting professional theatre productions for children and families since 1982, and has grown to become one of the most respected professional theatre companies in Canada. MTYP operates a Theatre School where over 1,500 children and teens learn the art and craft of theatre and related disciplines. AT MTYP, we believe that learning to appreciate and practice the art of theatre brings out the best in young people. Drama is a lot of fun, but it also creates opportunities to build confidence, make friends, and grow both as an artist and as a person.
MTYP is home to Native Youth Theatre (NYT), which provides free theatre programs for Indigenous youth between the ages of 9 and 18. NYT inspires youth by promoting Indigenous culture and storytelling while encouraging each students’ individuality to shine through. Our instructors facilitate the emergence of our students’ inner voice by focusing on their developing identities. Recognizing the adversity which young people experience on a day to day basis, NYT has created a safe, creative space which excludes discrimination based upon gender, race and status.
In our parallel session, staff from NYT and MTYP will explore the relationship between our companies, presenting some of the challenges we’ve faced and how we continue to work to recognize and break down barriers in the name of reconciliation. Students will discuss what their experiences have been like within our programs, and will present a short work from our 24/7 Performing Arts Festival for Teens. In the Festival, teens from MTYP and NYT come together to explore, create and perform 7 new plays in just 24 hours. The teens fulfill the jobs of actors, writers and directors, under the tutorship of theatre professionals.
Presenters:
Heather Russell-Smith Heather Russell-Smith is an actor and drama educator. As MTYP’s Drama Outreach Coordinator, she values the chance to discover every day the positive impact that theatre has in the lives of children.
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Nova Courchene Nova Courchene, Indigenous Project Coordinator
Nova Courchene is Anishinaabe-kwe from Sagkeeng First Nation and Rolling River in Manitoba. She is the Assistant Program Director at the Native Youth Theatre at Manitoba Theatre for Young People.
Winnipeg, MB
Themes: Social Justice & Reconciliation; Working with Youth
Seven Visions - Reconciliation Through Theatre Reconciliation is the restoration of friendly relations. It is a simple concept, but challenging to achieve when much reparation needs to be done. Now more than ever our community is recognizing the importance of creating pathways for truth and reconciliation. Sarasvàti Productions believe the arts have an important role to play and are excited to be working with seven Indigenous organizations on a project to explore Reconciliation Through Theatre. In January 2019, Sarasvàti Productions launched this community-based initiative. Consultation circles with Indigenous youth shaped the initial phase. Story-gathering followed using the arts to explore experiences in a colonized world. This project provides art-based workshops for youth to tell their stories. It will culminate in a large-scale theatrical production in May 2020, followed by a stripped down school tour. Using the arts to explore the current reality of racism will allow for a powerful step forward towards true reconciliation. It will also allow for an examination of the practice of theatre and how it too must change in order to model reconciliation. The results and lessons learned from the project will also have a long-term impact with changes to Sarasvàti’s practices moving forward and recommendations to other theatre practitioners.
This session will include an overview of the work since January 2019 as part of the Reconciliation Through Theatre project. Responses from consultation circles with Indigenous youth will be shared. Sarasvàti Productions’ artists will also outline the methods used for story gathering and provide an overview of adjustments required to actively role model reconciliation in the process of theatre creation. It will include a hands-on demonstration of techniques. An exclusive sneak peek of artwork and a reading of the work in progress being developed for performance will also be shared.
Presenters: The presentation is by a theatre company. Sarasvàti Productions is experimental and transformative theatre that presents significant social issues; engages in community collaboration; and supports emerging artists. An active independent theatre company in Winnipeg since 2000.
Specific staff and artists who will be presenting are:
Darla Contois Darla Contois, Project Facilitator
Darla Contois is a Cree/Salteaux artist from Misipawistik Cree Nation in Manitoba. She graduated from Toronto's Centre for Indigenous Theatre and won the Emerging Artist Award at Summerworks 2017 for "White Man’s Indian".
Marsha Knight Marsha Knight, Indigenous Coordinator
Marsha Knight has worked in the theatre and film industry for over 20 years. She has performed on stages nationally as well as at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.
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Hope McIntyre Hope McIntyre, Artistic Director
Hope has a BFA in performance and an MFA in theatre directing. She is a published playwright, free-lance director, and teaches at the University of Winnipeg.
Winnipeg, MB
Themes: Arts as a Cultural Medium; International Perspectives
Artistic Learning Styles to Enhance Reflective Practice in the Informal Sector in Kenya The informal sector in Kenya, otherwise referred to as the Jua Kali, is credited for the production of iconic African handicrafts, fashion, textile, furniture and other products that have today transcended their domestic or ceremonial significance and are traded as artifacts at the global market. The artifacts are produced by artisans who are trained through traditional apprenticeship. This paper interrogates some of the key features of artistic learning style in the Jua Kali sector; and how reflective practice can be used to determine a new mode of delivery using a mix of learning styles. The findings from the research and its potential contribution to Kenya's national economy and developmental agendas is instructive—there are key lessons to be learnt and implications for art education.
Presenter:
Mary Clare Kidenda Mary Clare Kidenda holds a Doctorate in Design and Visual Arts that focused on Digital Design Training Model for the Jua Kali in Kenya. She is the current Chair of the Department of Design and Creative Media, School of Creative Arts and Media Technology.
Kenya
Arts Integration: Visions and Realities For the last 18 months my research team has been examining different means for supporting teaching and learning of the arts in a primary school in a remote rural location in New Zealand. We are half way through this 3 year research project. Our aim is to better understand how to support teachers sustainably teach the arts across the curriculum. We are specifically interested in whole school strategies and perspectives as we are conscious that the survival of what happens in the classroom is shaped by multiple 'players' and many social, political, economic, and cultural factors. Our research is located in a small and economically poor school with 8 teachers. We have gathered qualitative and quantitative data and this presentation will speak to that data. The presentation will also speak to the reality issues of pursuing this research as experienced by the teachers within the research.
Presenter:
Ralph Buck Ralph Buck is Head of Dance Studies, University of Auckland. He has been recognised with several teaching, research and leadership awards. His research and teaching has been presented around the world and in leading research journals and books. His work with international organizations draws attention to potential roles of dance as a dynamic agent for change within security, health and education concerns.
New Zealand
Themes: Arts & Learning for Youth & Children; Artist Partnerships; International Perspectives
Reconceptualising the Artist-in-Residence An Artist-in-Residence program implies an artist "resides" in an environment for a period of time, supported by an institution or benefactor to research, reflect, create, develop, present and/or produce during this residency. The financial obligations on the part of the institution make these programs difficult to establish and/or sustain without ongoing government or benefactor support, or significant marketing know-how to generate income from such a program. The arts education team in studio Five at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education has designed a flexible hosting program that invites artists into the arts components of various programs by reconceptualising traditional notions of the Artist-in-Residence with a greater focus on mutual in-kind benefits and minimal expenditure. This paper presents a range of strategies used for Artist-in-Residence experiences across drama, music, the visual arts and humanities we have brought to our university students and our school communities, including teachers and children, during 2018-19.
Presenter:
Neryl Jeanneret Associate Professor Neryl Jeanneret lectures in undergraduate and postgraduate music and arts education at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education where she leads the Artistic and Creative Education group. Her research has focused on artists working with children and young people, engagement in music classrooms, teacher education in the arts, and Creative Education.
Australia
The Artground Experiment: Building a community of artists to develop work for young audiences This research narrative follows the Groundbreakers (2018) incubation program initiated by The Artground (Singapore) where selected artists embark on a year-long process to conceptualize, devise, and test out works for young audiences. The research team conducted semi-structured interviews with the Groundbreaker artists at the beginning, mid-way and at the end of the program, also following through with observations of some of the rehearsals, trials and performances the artists have put up throughout the program, including an incubation lab the artists were invited to participate in. The findings of this research narrative will focus on the key learnings of two Groundbreaker movement artist groups, reflecting on the creative process and pragmatic considerations in making work for young audiences, balancing between performance, interactivity, children's agency, and an invitation to play. The support system provided by The Artground team in encouraging the experimental and exploratory process by the artists will also be discussed.
Presenter:
Chee Hoo Lum Chee-Hoo Lum is Associate Professor of Music Education in the Visual & Performing Academic Group at the National Institute of Education. He is the head of UNESCO-NIE Centre for Arts Research in Education. Chee Hoo's research interests include issues towards identity, cultural diversity and multiculturalism, technology and globalization in music education, creativity, and elementary music methods.
Singapore
Themes: Social Justice & Reconciliation; Visual Art
Spark: The power of emotion and the senses Art has the capacity to receive, give, embrace, and transform while providing a springboard for distinctive conversations both personal and as a community.
Through my own practice, my community-engaged work, and my role at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery as the Public Programming Coordinator, I create multi-faceted opportunities to appreciate the power of art and artfulness while always being mindful of accessibility and inclusivity. People of all ages, abilities, genders, heritages, and socio-economic statuses are invited to learn, share, be creative, develop skills, tell stories, and enjoy camaraderie.
My work provides a spark and invites a sense of mystery and discovery. Finding deeper meanings through art can be visceral so people may figure out their own intentions and connections.
Many of my community-engaged art projects involve stitching on paper or fabric using embroidery thread; handmade inks which I make from the built, wild and hybrid landscapes; found materials; and other marking mediums. In many ways, I create site-specific art projects by working in and around the spaces between process, participation, performance, and installation as well as the missing portions between the real and the imagined. I’m very committed to reducing the environmental impact of my arts practice and showing others how to do so.
Recent personal community-engaged arts projects include work with Waterlution’s Great Art for Great Lakes initiative (2017), Shelter House (2017), the City of Thunder Bay (2018), Neechee Studio (2018), Definitely Superior Art Gallery (2018), Northwestern Ontario Women’s Centre Honouring Our Stories project with the survivors of abuse (2018 & 2019), Ocean Bridge (2019 – 2020).
With the Thunder Bay Art Gallery, I’ve designed and offered programming that opens new doors for all participants to enjoy a discovery experience of artmaking, the exhibits, and other daily possibilities and interactions.
Presenter:
Betty Carpick Betty Carpick is an inter-disciplinary artist, educator, and environmentalist whose practice looks at issues in serious and playful ways. She’s of Cree descent from Northern Manitoba and lives in Thunder Bay, Ontario.
Thunder Bay, ON
Exploring Truth and Reconciliation through the Power of Art This presentation will highlight the results of a research study conducted at Soaring Eagles, an Indigenous Alternative Secondary School located in the Niagara Region, Ontario, Canada. In the fall of 2017, with very little to no visual arts taking place in a program with students whose culture was naturally rich in the arts, the researcher proposed to implement a project to engage the secondary students in an exploration of the Calls to Action put forward by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, in 2012. Using visual arts as the language of communication, this research project served a two-fold goal - a) to familiarize the students with the language and creation of art as found in the learning expectations in the Ontario Visual Arts Curriculum, and b) to give the students a voice to use the language of art as a vehicle to express their thoughts, ideas and personal stories around the content found in the Calls to Action shared in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Report and what these Calls to Action meant to them as Indigenous youth living in Canada today. The project culminated in an exhibition of the student artwork being showcased in the spring of 2018, at Rodman Hall Art Centre, Brock University, the largest art gallery in the Niagara Region. This presentation will also include post project reflections made by the student artists involved in the project as well as reflections by the classroom teacher, as a result of interviews conducted after the project was completed.
Presenter:
Dr. Peter Vietgen Dr. Peter Vietgen is an Associate Professor of Art Education in the Faculty of Education, Brock University, and is the current President of the Canadian Society for Education through Art.
St. Catharines, ON
Parallel sessions are subject to change.
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